The Story of Canterbury

The Story of Canterbury

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The Story of Canterbury

The Story of Canterbury

Read FREE!

Excerpt

It is only a mind overflowing with conceit for the supremacy of man that will expect to find the human race present at the birth of Canterbury. Viewed in a properly logical perspective, Canterbury is the creation of vast geological and physical forces to which little men have bowed, forces which they have turned to what use their strength permitted. The beginning of Canterbury was the marshy valley of the Stour River, as it is now called, at the psychological moment in its course, as it were, where its water was spread wide enough to make it shallow and fordable, and yet not too wide to make it unduly inconvenient. In these prehuman days, the tide of the sea swept over the marsh which is now the dry land of many of the city streets. This spot was just on the border line between the open country of the plains of Kent and the thickly wooded and hillier land which lay away beyond to the south, where the woods were a barrier to easy habitation and use. But the top ridges of these hills were more barren; and along the North Downs of Kent came that oldest of all British roads, which carried the tin, dug from the Cornish mines, to the ships which were to take it over the Channel or perhaps even round the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean peoples. It was this road which, in the far-distant centuries, was to become the Pilgrims' Way.

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