Henry Miller and the Critics

Henry Miller and the Critics

Henry Miller and the Critics

Henry Miller and the Critics

Excerpt

When the name of the Henry Miller who is the subject of this book began to be heard in the 1930s, a good many people thought of the actor who had starred in The Devil's Disciple and The Great Divide. But wasn't he dead? (Yes, 1926.) Before long, however, the Henry Miller from the 14th Ward, Brooklyn, had given the world such a shaking that he became the Henry Miller people thought of, and the other one was reduced to a minor rôle in American theatrical history.

Our first acquaintance with the writing Miller came to some of us in Peter Neagoe's anthology, Americans Abroad, printed in Holland in 1932. Miller's contribution was a story "Mademoiselle Claude," concerning a fille de joie who was to turn up in his subsequent work. In the style of Americans Abroad, the author's picture, bibliography, and biography preceded his contribution. The photograph of Miller showed a man nearly bald, wearing glasses with heavy black rims, through which he stared out impassively at the photographer. His bibliography read:

Written three books, none of which accepted thus far. Also about a hundred short stories, some of which appeared in various American magazines. Last book, a novel, will be published anonymously.

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