Marshlands and Prometheus Misbound: Two Satires

Marshlands and Prometheus Misbound: Two Satires

Marshlands and Prometheus Misbound: Two Satires

Marshlands and Prometheus Misbound: Two Satires

Excerpt

Tuesday

TOWARDS FIVE O'CLOCK the day grew cooler, I shut my windows and went back to my writing.

At six o'clock in came my great friend Hubert; he was on his way from riding-school.

He said: "I say! Are you working?"

I replied: "I am writing Marshlands."

"And what is Marshlands?" "A book."

"Would I like it?" "No."

"Too clever?" "Too boring."

"Why write it, then?" "If I didn't, who would?"

"Still more confessions?" "Hardly any."

"What then?" "Sit down."

And when he had sat down, I said: "I have read the following lines in Virgil:

Et tibi magna satis quamvis lapis omnia nudus
limosoque palus obducat pascua junco.

Let me translate: a shepherd is talking to another shepherd; he tells him his field is, no doubt, full of stony ground and bogs, but it's good enough for him, and he is very happy to be contented with it.--No thought could be wiser, when a man cannot change his field, what do you say? . . ." Hubert said nothing. I proceeded:

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