Regional Organization of the Social Security Administration: A Case Study

Regional Organization of the Social Security Administration: A Case Study

Regional Organization of the Social Security Administration: A Case Study

Regional Organization of the Social Security Administration: A Case Study

Excerpt

The increase in the service and regulatory activities of the Federal government has caused Federal departments to develop more and more establishments in the field. Along with this process has come the necessity for the organizational consolidation of decentralized units, especially on the regional level. The Social Security Board was an early attempt to provide for the overall regional organization of an entire Federal agency. This study was made to investigate the organizational problems involved in the regional administration and organization of the Social Security Board and its successor, the Social Security Administration (SSA).

The treatment of the regional organization of the Social Security Board and the SSA in this book is entirely in terms of organizational problems. The volume deals with such matters as the effect of central organization upon regional organization, the determination of regional headquarters and geographical area, the determination of lines of supervision, the problems which functionalization introduces into field supervision especially in the administration of federal-state programs, the difficulties of field coordination, clearance, communication, and control, and the nature of general regional command.

Except for simple descriptive material this volume is not concerned with the content or the techniques of the substantive jobs executed on the regional level by the various bureaus of the Social Security Board and the SSA, since the object is not to discuss regional administration in terms of federalstate relations or programs and nationally administered programs, but in terms of organizational matters. For this same reason the degree of substantive authority enjoyed by the various regional representatives of the bureaus of the Social Security Board and the SSA has not been a matter of main concern because such an analysis would be possible only through an exhaustive description of the programs of Board . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.