Life and Letters of Edwin Lawrence Godkin - Vol. 2

Life and Letters of Edwin Lawrence Godkin - Vol. 2

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Life and Letters of Edwin Lawrence Godkin - Vol. 2

Life and Letters of Edwin Lawrence Godkin - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

It was Matthew Arnold who said of Mr. Godkin that he was "a typical specimen of the Irishman of culture." The Celtic temperament was there: the spontaneity, the large impulse, the vivacity, the joy of combat. Not even the mystic element was wanting, -- a brooding strain, a touch of the Obermensch; he half laughingly believed in omens and presentments. Thus we find him writing: "When I woke, I was in great grief over Mrs. Gurney's death, of which I thought I had just heard the news. This dream about Mrs. Gurney has frightened me a little. I have had some very striking dreams, and am always impressed by a vivid one." All, however, was steadied and controlled by the widest outlook upon history and upon life. In Mr. Godkin was strangely blended the philosopher and the man of action. Of unusual social charm, gladly warming both hands at the fire of life, he was also given to detached and deep and sometimes melancholy reflection. A phrase of his own in a letter to Norton was shrewdly selfdescriptive: "I unfortunately cannot live in the . . .

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