Psychotherapy, East and West

Psychotherapy, East and West

Psychotherapy, East and West

Psychotherapy, East and West

Excerpt

The subject of this book has been "in the air" for at least thirty years, and during this time there has been an ever- growing discussion of this or that parallel between Western psychotherapy and Eastern philosophy. But thus far no one has attempted, comprehensively, to find some basic design common to the methods and objectives of psychotherapy, on the one hand, and the disciplines of Buddhism, Vedanta, Yoga, and Taoism, on the other. The latter are not, perhaps, psychotherapies in the strict sense, but there is enough resemblance to make the comparison important.

The discussion seems to have begun in the early 1930's, following such works as Richard Wilhelm's translation of a Chinese text, The Secret of the Golden Flower, with a long psychological commentary by C. G. Jung (1929),G. R. Heyer's Der Organismus der Seele (1932), and Geraldine Coster's Yoga and Western Psychology (1934). I have been deeply interested in this fruitful between East and West almost from its beginnings. I also made some contribution to it in a rather immature book called The Legacy of Asia and Western Man (1937), and a little later in The Meaning of Happiness (1940), which bore the subtitle "The Quest for Freedom of the Spirit in Modern Psychology and in the Wisdom of the East." At that time, almost the only form of psychotherapy which was thus "oriented" was the Jungian. But subsequent developments both in psychotherapy . . .

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