The Religious Faith of John Fiske

The Religious Faith of John Fiske

The Religious Faith of John Fiske

The Religious Faith of John Fiske

Excerpt

A part of the task of the Christian philosopher in any age is the interpretation of the Christian message to his contemporaries. The danger inherent in this undertaking is obvious. There is always present the possibility that the content of the message may be colored and changed by the peculiarities of the restatement. The evaluation of the work of any thinker who has undertaken this task, therefore, must include consideration both of the man and of his age, both of what he believed and of the way in which he attempted to express his beliefs. It is this latter task which we propose, using as the subject of our consideration and evaluation the popular lecturer and writer in the fields of history and religious philosophy, John Fiske.

The age in which Fiske lived, the latter half of the nineteenth century, was an age in which philosophical, religious, and historical concepts were being modified by certain conclusions which the studies of biological evolution had suggested. Like many others of his generation, he saw these changes as evidences of a renaissance in thought. He once remarked that the age in which he lived would be known to future historians as "especially the era of the decomposition of orthodoxies." Although the insight of that prophecy was limited, it was a true expression of the spirit that dominated the man and his age. As a religious . . .

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