Tudor & Stuart Lincoln

Tudor & Stuart Lincoln

Tudor & Stuart Lincoln

Tudor & Stuart Lincoln

Excerpt

Like its predecessor Medieval Lincoln, this book is the product of the residuary moments of a busy life, and its progress has been constantly interrupted by work which at the time seemed to matter more. If in consequence there are inconsistencies of viewpoint or form I hope they may be forgiven.

In writing both books I have had especially in mind two classes of readers: those who may be able to use the local evidence in treating of wider historical themes which are themselves beyond my scope and purpose; and those who, living mostly in or near Lincoln, or having associations with it, may find that the tale will aid their historical imagination and make the city a more interesting place to live in or to visit. I believe that local history is a stimulus to civic spirit, and I should like to think that the books have indirectly served the cause of local government.

The principal sources of evidence on which I have relied are the records of the Lincoln Corporation, and in particular the minutes of the common council. The earliest surviving council register begins in 1511, in time to make it possible to write Chapter II. No such survey could be written for any earlier period. Thereafter the minutes continue unbroken save for the period from 1638 to (except for a few entries) 1656. Detailed references to them would have so heavily incumbered the footnotes that I have had to abandon their citation. Students will readily identify the evidence gathered from this source. The minutes were calendared, but inadequately, for the Historical Manuscripts Commission by W. D. Macray in 1895, and a catalogue of the Corporation records, compiled by W. de Gray Birch, was published in 1906. The records are now in process of transfer to the Lincolnshire Archives Office. There are, in addition, the city quarter sessions records, the cordwainers' gild book and the Christ's Hospital minutes and accounts. I have drawn on the miscellaneous collections of the Lincoln Public Library, including a small group of Sir Robert Clayton's papers; a few more of them are in my own possession. There are a few manuscripts relating to the history of Lincoln School, and several of the city parishes have records of the period.

The scope for research has been vastly increased by the creation of the Lincolnshire Archives Office, which incorporates the Lincoln Diocesan Record Office, founded as a memorial to Canon Foster by the Pilgrim Trust. It is administered by a joint committee of the three administrative counties of Lindsey, Kesteven and Holland and the city and county . . .

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