Soviet Imperialism: Russia's Drive toward World Domination

Soviet Imperialism: Russia's Drive toward World Domination

Soviet Imperialism: Russia's Drive toward World Domination

Soviet Imperialism: Russia's Drive toward World Domination

Excerpt

The scope of this study is Soviet territorial aggrandizement during the ten year period from 1939 to 1949, as such. It does not take into account Soviet Russia's tactics in Poland, Rumania, China, or elsewhere unless those tactics relate directly to the extension of the territorial domain. Moreover, it is not concerned with Soviet occupation policies in Germany, Austria, or Korea. It does, however, take into account those Soviet demands which relate to territory in Iran, Turkey, Tripolitania, Spitsbergen, and other areas. It is essentially an analysis of the concepts and methods underlying Soviet aggrandizement.

Further territorial expansion by the Soviet Union may well result in a third world war. There are of course a variety of other factors which might contribute to a new war, but expansion is the primary one. In this respect, the doctrine of Communism is a cause only in so far as it acts as an agent of Soviet territorial aggrandizement. By way of illustration, there are few who do not abhor the barbaric methods employed within any totalitarian state--Jewish persecutions in Nazi Germany, Protestant persecutions in Fascist Spain, political persecutions in the USSR--but the casus belli is latent until such a state seeks to extend its territories at the expense of others.

Studies of history show that the ability of a state to expand is based chiefly on its internal strength and geopolitical factors. Nazi Germany did not necessarily fail because the Allies were right and Hitler's philosophy was wrong. It failed because it had neither the man power, industrial potential, land mass, or over-all strength equal to that of the Allied Powers.

If Britain succeeded in conquering India, the Americans in defeating Mexico, the Spaniards in pillaging the Incas, it was not because their cause was morally right, but because they were materially more advanced. Trotskyites, Falangists, and anarchists present little or no threat to world order not because their doctrines are false or wicked, but because no great state supports their philosophy. The philosophy of Marx is potent primarily because a great state interprets and supports its teachings. As a system of thought it would certainly rank no . . .

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