Modern Philosophies and Education

Modern Philosophies and Education

Modern Philosophies and Education

Modern Philosophies and Education

Excerpt

In 1942 Part I of the Forty-first Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education appeared under the title Philosophies of Education. In that volume, leading exponents of the currently most prominent philosophies of education contributed chapters expounding their respective points of view. The yearbook was a valuable contribution to the comparative study of educational philosophy because within the covers of a single book it enabled the reader to get a quick survey of the distinctive thought of each philosophic system stated by an advocate of that system.

In order to augment even further the philosophical resources available for the guidance of those engaged in education, the National Society is here projecting a second yearbook in educational philosophy. In this yearbook it seeks to acquaint teachers not only with more points of view but also with new authors. While the Forty-first Yearbook invited leading philosophers of education to contribute to its pages, the present yearbook has invited men from general philosophy. In the field of general philosophy there are not only more varieties of opinion than in the more limited field of education, but there are also a number of prominent philosophers whose views on education, if once worked out from their authors' philosophical premises, may very well provide fresh insights into educational problems. While professional education undoubtedly stands to benefit from the consideration given its problems by general philosophy, we may well hope at the same time that general philosophers will find their problems somewhat clearer by virtue of having thought them through in terms of their educational implications.

In projecting this yearbook, the Board of Directors of the Society has realized from the start that general philosophers, although usually acquainted with education as professors in colleges and universities, might not be equally familiar with the problems of education at . . .

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