Teaching Adolescents in Secondary Schools: The Principles of Effective Teaching in Junior and Senior High Schools

Teaching Adolescents in Secondary Schools: The Principles of Effective Teaching in Junior and Senior High Schools

Teaching Adolescents in Secondary Schools: The Principles of Effective Teaching in Junior and Senior High Schools

Teaching Adolescents in Secondary Schools: The Principles of Effective Teaching in Junior and Senior High Schools

Excerpt

Few experiences are the equivalent of the process of revising a book after a decade has elapsed. Rereading what one wrote a little more than ten years earlier focuses attention on the changes in thinking and in practices that have occurred, changes that are sometimes unnoticed as they go on from day to day.

During the past decade, secondary school teachers have seen the reappraisal of the curriculum by both educators and laymen, the development of new proposals for changes in the organization of secondary education and in curricular practices, increased concern for the education of bright adolescents, and growing recognition of the impact which population movements have had on the secondary school.

These four factors are reflected in this edition but not to the exclusion of other major questions that are also important for secondary school teachers. Schools must adjust to changes in the society they serve, but they must be more than weather vanes which change direction with each breeze.

At no other period has secondary education been the topic of so much public discussion. Unfortunately, much of the criticism of secondary education has been emotional rather than rational, and the factual basis for the criticism has sometimes been less than convincing. Yet, educators themselves have raised significantly pointed questions. Without becoming defensive or panicky, educators have been re-examining school practices in order to see whether secondary education can be improved, and how. This revaluation is bound to help secondary education, for the teacher's level of aspiration affects the quality of learning just as surely as the student's level of aspiration does.

The secondary school teacher must be capable of examining the . . .

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