R. G. Collingwood

R. G. Collingwood

R. G. Collingwood

R. G. Collingwood

Excerpt

Among modern philosophers, the subject of this essay was distinguished not merely for his superb literary talents, but for his grasp of the intimate relation between philosophy and the sciences, and above all between philosophy and literature. Admittedly, these qualities alone would not have sufficed to make him a great philosopher. But they were not developed alone; they were fructified in the course of his growth as a profound and original thinker, and as an integral element in that development. If Collingwood was a brilliant philosophical writer, it was as much because he had something fresh to say as because he knew how to say it. In so doing, he appealed over the heads of academic thinkers to the select public which will always exist for such disinterested teaching, and which survives owing to the periodical emergence of men of his type. And what he had to say at once broadened the scope of contemporary philosophical enquiry and derived in turn from his wide range of subsidiary interests: as historian, as archaeologist, as translator, as artist, as musician.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.