The Native Brotherhoods: Modern Intertribal Organizations on the Northwest Coast

The Native Brotherhoods: Modern Intertribal Organizations on the Northwest Coast

The Native Brotherhoods: Modern Intertribal Organizations on the Northwest Coast

The Native Brotherhoods: Modern Intertribal Organizations on the Northwest Coast

Excerpt

The Alaska Native Brotherhood and the Native Brotherhood of British Columbia are organizations whose history and accomplishments are known to but few people outside of Alaska and British Columbia. Even social scientists and culture historians whose field of interest is the process of adjustment of native groups to present-day American and Canadian civilization are, in general, unfamiliar with them. Yet the two organizations are not only unique in western North America, but have been active for some time -- the Alaskan one for over four decades -- and throughout their history they have been seeking to solve certain problems of acculturation. Their main concern has been, actually, to further acculturation among the Indians. It seemed obvious that a study of them would be rewarding, particularly from the point of view of determining what the Indian himself regarded as the significant aspects of acculturation. There was also the interesting situation created by the fact that the Indians of coastal British Columbia and those of Alaska shared a host of common cultural patterns in aboriginal times, and at present as well (for example, their heavy dependence, economically speaking, on the commercial fishing industry), but their political status is very different. Thus, analysis of the developments of the two organizations might be expected to provide some interesting comparative material.

The present study is basically one in cultural adjustment and acculturation, but in a very specialized way. It makes no pretense at covering the whole acculturational picture on the entire coast; attention is focused primarily on the two organizations and the parts they played and are playing in the adjustment processes. There are other aspects of acculturation which I have not touched at all. It seems worth remarking here that I am convinced that the Northwest Coast . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.