Revolt on the Campus

Revolt on the Campus

Revolt on the Campus

Revolt on the Campus

Excerpt

"Individualism is dying at Yale, and without a fight." That was Bill Buckley's somber conclusion in his 1951 bestseller, God and Man at Yale. And I can testify that, as of that year, it was depressingly correct.

I was a bewildered New Haven freshman when "Bill's book" fell upon a startled campus and exploded it into controversy. Indeed, I had hardly had time to become acquainted with the world of Yale before I found myself confronted with, and partially engaged in, a furious dialogue on its virtues and demerits.

The dispute which unfolded around God and Man was an education in itself. The Yale of 1951 was a community in which Liberalism, among faculty and undergraduates alike, ruled virtually without challenge. I had begun to sense this fact on my own, but the response to Bill's book vastly accelerated my understanding of it. For it established that Yale's fidelity to "free inquiry" was peculiarly selective--that it did not extend to conservative inquiries about the political impact of the Yale curriculum.

God and Man consisted of two parts: first, a critique of the intellectual tendency of a Yale education, canvassing curricular and extracurricular pressures; and second, a theory of "aca-

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