Negro Leadership in a Southern City

Negro Leadership in a Southern City

Negro Leadership in a Southern City

Negro Leadership in a Southern City

Excerpt

A little over a decade ago, in his presidential address before the American Sociological Association, E. Franklin Frazier urged his colleagues to develop broader and more meaningful research in race relations. Man has been intrigued with studies of race and ethnic phenomena over the past century. Yet in the twelve years since Frazier expressed a concern shared by many others, there has been more valuable analysis in the field than ever before. Concepts and approaches of a generation or two ago are now considered inadequate. Studies stressing value declarations, deterministic notions, or pure description have gradually given way to those drawing upon concepts, hypotheses, and findings from other areas of the social sciences. The speed with which majority-minority relations are changing throughout the world, coupled with our changing knowledge about these relations, makes us aware that our progress has been small indeed. But, hopefully, a growing research interest in theoretical developments will integrate race relations into a gradually developing theory of human behavior.

A current point of departure that is especially promising views majority-minority relations as an aspect of power relations. Explanations of prejudice and discrimination, of cooperation, accommodation, and conflict, can be found, among other places, in the power arrangements of our . . .

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