Peace Can Be Won

Peace Can Be Won

Peace Can Be Won

Peace Can Be Won

Excerpt

In my Washington apartment one evening late last spring Bernard Baruch was our guest for dinner. The conversation turned to a speech I was planning to give at Wellesley College. In this speech, as I explained to Mr. Baruch, I was hoping to make clear to the Wellesley students and alumnae something of the nature of the titanic struggle taking place between our free world and the Kremlin.

Our guest has been long recognized as an authority on this crucial topic of our times, and as we discussed it he leaned forward eagerly, tilting his hearing aid first toward Mrs. Hoffman and then toward me.

When I told Mr. Baruch that the title of my talk was to be The Cold War Is a Good War , his reply was characteristically abrupt. "You'll never make people understand the true character of this fight," he said, "until you stop talking about the 'cold war' and start talking about waging the peace."

I followed Mr. Baruch's advice and I did talk at Wellesley about waging the peace. A few days later, events like seismic shocks went sweeping round the world. On the surface it seemed that to be preoccupied with peace was to be unrealistic. On June 25, 1950, the North Koreans launched their aggression against the Republic of Korea. In usual Communist double talk they described it as a "peace march," even as their tanks and artillery swarmed across the 38th Parallel. The Security Council of the United Nations labeled the attack an unprovoked invasion and called "upon all members to render every assistance to stop aggression." The forces of the United Nations which responded to that call, forces which came largely from the United States, have met with fluctuating fortunes, disasters and triumphs. International tensions rose toward climax as the North Korean Army was reinforced by several hundred thousand new troops--the Chinese "volunteers."

The world situation had become so threatening that on December 16, 1950, President Truman proclaimed a state of national emergency. Barely six years after V-J Day, we in America are partially mobilizing our men, our materials and our machines, fusing them into military might. In the meantime, the Kremlin is looking with ever . . .

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