Federal Tax Treatment of the Family: A Background Paper Prepared for a Conference of Experts Held April 4-5, 1963, Together with a Summary of the Conference Discussion

Federal Tax Treatment of the Family: A Background Paper Prepared for a Conference of Experts Held April 4-5, 1963, Together with a Summary of the Conference Discussion

Federal Tax Treatment of the Family: A Background Paper Prepared for a Conference of Experts Held April 4-5, 1963, Together with a Summary of the Conference Discussion

Federal Tax Treatment of the Family: A Background Paper Prepared for a Conference of Experts Held April 4-5, 1963, Together with a Summary of the Conference Discussion

Excerpt

The provisions of the federal individual income tax relating to the treatment of the family have an important bearing on the fairness of our tax system. Since the adoption of the income tax in 1913, the federal law has made an allowance for the personal circumstances of the taxpayer through the personal exemption. In 1948, the present $600 per capita exemption, the additional exemptions for the aged and the blind, and income splitting were adopted. In 1954, a deduction of up to $600 was allowed for the expenses of child care incurred by working mothers and by single people. These provisions do not arouse widespread public disapproval or criticism, although many experts contend that they do not provide an entirely rational basis for the tax treatment of the family.

This volume includes a study undertaken by Professor Harold M. Groves to provide background material for a conference on the tax treatment of the family, held at the Brookings Institution on April 4 and 5, 1963, together with a summary of the discussion at the conference. The purpose of the conference was to provide an opportunity for a group of experts to analyze the present provisions and to narrow down the differences of opinion with regard to this significant element of the tax system.

The conference was attended by twenty-seven attorneys and economists from universities, research institutions, government agencies, and private practice, representing various shades of opinion on the tax treatment of the family. The participants were invited in their personal capacities and not as representatives of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

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