Woodrow Wilson's China Policy, 1913-1917

Woodrow Wilson's China Policy, 1913-1917

Woodrow Wilson's China Policy, 1913-1917

Woodrow Wilson's China Policy, 1913-1917

Excerpt

This volume begins with the academic career of Woodrow Wilson who, no deep student of the Far East, only casually touched upon this area in his writings. His knowledge of China was chiefly acquired through his contact with American missionaries and friends working in that country. With a sense of pride and superiority he thought that the United States as a leading Pacific power should help to implant the basic principles of Christianity and democracy in Chinese soil. Out of a profound sympathy for the weak, oppressed and underdeveloped peoples, he became benevolently inclined toward China as an independent nation.

President Woodrow Wilson's approach to Chinese problems was tactically different from that of his predecessor, although both of them basically championed traditional American policy. Wilson boldly reversed the practice of international cooperation, the basis of Taft's diplomacy. Taft had favored the cooperation of American bankers, with the blessing of the department of state, in an international financial consortium so as to chaperon the bankers of the European imperialistic powers lest they impose on China's integrity contrary to the Hay policy. Wilson favored the Hay policy but would not lend the countenance of the United States government to selected or favored American bankers. To the surprise of the world, Wilson impulsively announced his disapproval of continued participation of the American banking group in the Six-Power Consortium. Soon after, he accorded de jure recognition to the Republic of China independently of other powers.

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