Language and Intelligence

Language and Intelligence

Language and Intelligence

Language and Intelligence

Excerpt

Until recently there was an established and integrated philosophical corpus, of problems if not of solutions to them, which covered the field of epistemology as well as of logic. It might be called "the classical position". Though it left scope for major doctrinal differences, it was united in certain fundamentals; and by many contemporary philosophers it has been decisively rejected.

The rejection has taken two forms: attacks upon the classical position, and independent progress towards another. The attacks were mainly directed against metaphysical thinking and the obscure language in which it was often expressed. Sometimes they examined with a new critical rigour the problems connected with universals. But the antagonism to metaphysics resulted from the positive side of the new outlook; and this, moreover, has given every individual philosophical problem a new appearance, and transformed the discussion of it.

There is no closed and settled group of principles, which anyone would accept if he were sympathetic to this new approach; but one can usually trace, among its followers, a certain community of interest, of method, and of solution. In the main, the new philosophical outlook has developed because the verbal language, in which the problems of philosophy are both expressed and resolved, has been thought of in a new way. This has been made possible first by developing formal logic and applying its techniques to ordinary language, and then by the realization that language and logic could not be identified. Thus . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.