Land for Tomorrow: The Underdeveloped World

Land for Tomorrow: The Underdeveloped World

Land for Tomorrow: The Underdeveloped World

Land for Tomorrow: The Underdeveloped World

Excerpt

No problem confronting us today is more important than that of matching the world's use of its natural resources with the needs of its people. Since food is essential to all life, the use of land for food production is always in the forefront of the picture. In recent years the urgency of the problems of food supply has been brought home to some countries by acute shortages, a restricted dietary, or rationing, to others by soaring prices. International gatherings, official and unofficial, have debated the many complex issues involved; the United Nations has set up the World Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); many books have appeared ranging from the almost hysterically pessimistic to the ebulliently optimistic. Even when discussion is on a world basis, views are too frequently colored by national backgrounds. Nevertheless, rising above all of them are such declarations as President Truman's Point IV and the preamble from the British Colonial Development and Welfare Act which indicate clearly the sense of responsibility shared by the English-speaking world. Independent of domestic problems, though inseparable . . .

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