New Zealand in the Making: A Study of Economic and Social Development

New Zealand in the Making: A Study of Economic and Social Development

New Zealand in the Making: A Study of Economic and Social Development

New Zealand in the Making: A Study of Economic and Social Development

Excerpt

So many friends have given generous assistance in the preparation of this book that it has almost become a co-operative work. My heaviest debt is expressed in the dedication to Dr James Hight, Rector of Canterbury College, who first started me on the preparation of the research material more than fifteen years ago, and whose critical scholarship and unique knowledge of New Zealand economics and history have been freely placed at my disposal ever since. My former chief and Colleague, Mr Malcolm Fraser, and Mr. J. W. Butcher, of the Census and Statistics Office, have safeguarded me from many statistical errors; Sir Apirana Ngata, Dr P. H. Buck, and Mr F. M. Keesing have supplied materials without which the second chapter on the Maoris could never have been written, and Mr W. Stewart, Commissioner of Crown Lands for the Canterbury District, kindly checked my references to land legislation.

I owe special thanks also to Mr J. L. Martin, of the Lands and Survey Department, Christchurch, for patiently assembling the scattered information and drawing the excellent maps on which for the first time, as far as I am aware, the quality and tenurial distribution of New Zealand lands are clearly shown. Mr George Lawn, of Canterbury College, rendered a similar service in bringing up to date and drawing the diagrams of trade and public expenditure.

I have drawn freely not only upon my own published work, but also upon the research dissertations prepared by students under my direction at Canterbury College. As far as I am aware, all specific obligations are acknowledged in the notes and references appended to the book; but I must acknowledge also the help I received over many years from discussion of New Zealand economic problems with my colleagues of the New Zealand university colleges, as well as in the classroom discussions, both within Canterbury College and in the Workers' Educational Association tutorial classes. The close contact maintained since 1924 between my department and the Canterbury Chamber of . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.