Partnership for Progress: A Program for Transatlantic Action

Partnership for Progress: A Program for Transatlantic Action

Partnership for Progress: A Program for Transatlantic Action

Partnership for Progress: A Program for Transatlantic Action

Excerpt

We do not regard a strong and united Europe as a rival but as a partner. To aid its progress has been a basic object of our foreign policy for seventeen years. We believe that a united Europe will be capable of playing a greater role in the common defense, of responding more generously to the needs of poorer nations, of joining with the United States and others in lowering trade barriers, resolving problems of currency and commodities, and developing coordinated policies in all other economic, diplomatic and political areas. We see in such a Europe a partner with whom the United States could deal on a basis of full equality in all the great and burdensome tasks of building and defending a community of free nations.

-- President Kennedy "Declaration of Interdependence" at Philadelphia, July 4, 1962.

Atlantic partnership...will...be built upon two mighty pillars:

America on the one side, and an integrated Europe on the other. Their constant exchange of ideas, their increasing cooperation, coordination of their action are the essence of the new order of things.

-- President Walter Hallstein of the European Common Market, New York, April 24, 1962.

Our aim is to make a true European unity. Then and only then will Europe be great and strong enough to build a more equal and worthy partnership with America. The right relationship between friends and allies is the relationship of equal balance and cooperation in which no partner seeks to dominate the others or dictate to the others.

-- Prime Minister Macmillan at Liverpool, January 2, 1963.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.