Western Unity and the Common Market

Western Unity and the Common Market

Western Unity and the Common Market

Western Unity and the Common Market

Excerpt

Recently I went to Western Europe in order to have a look at the grand project of the Western Alliance -- the Common Market, enlarged by the admission of Great Britain and joined with us in a wide free trading area. I set out with a strong conviction that the project was desirable, indeed necessary, that it was part of the manifest destiny of the Western world.

I still think this. But I confess that my enthusiasm was stronger than my knowledge of what are the dominant forces in the new Europe as it has come to be recently. I had not realized that the grand project was complicated by the nuclear stalemate, by the success of the Common Market, by the lack of any known and clear succession in France and Germany, and by our own fading economic pre-eminence.

The road ahead will be a rough one, and if the hopes of the Western Alliance are to be realized, it will not be soon. The grand project is caught up in a crisis of power and leadership within the Western Alliance. We have a right to believe that with patience, lucidity and resolution the crisis will eventually be overcome. For it is true, I think, that throughout Europe there is a deep and ardent determination to conquer the obstacles, if necessary by outliving them.

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