Marx's Concept of Man

Marx's Concept of Man

Marx's Concept of Man

Marx's Concept of Man

Excerpt

The bulk of this volume contains an English translation of Karl Marx main philosophical work, published for the first time in the United States . Obviously, this publication is of importance, if for no other reason than that it will acquaint the American public with one of the major works of post-Hegelian philosophy, hitherto. unknown in the English-speaking world. Marx's philosophy, like much of existentialist thinking, represents a protest against man's alienation, his loss of himself and his transformation into a thing; it is a movement against the dehumanization and automatization of man inherent in the development of Western industrialism. It is ruthlessly critical of all "answers" to the problem of human existence which try to present solutions by negating or camouflaging the dichotomies inherent in man's existence. Marx's philosophy is rooted in the humanist Western philosophical tradition, which reaches from Spinoza through the French and German enlightenment philosophers of the eighteenth century to Goethe and Hegel, and the very essence of which is concern for man and the realization of his potentialities.

For Marx's philosophy, which has found its most articulate expression in the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts, the central issue is that of the existence of the real individual man, who is what he does, and whose "nature" unfolds and reveals itself in history. But in contrast to Kierkegaard and others, Marx sees man in his . . .

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