Behavioral Science in Management

Behavioral Science in Management

Behavioral Science in Management

Behavioral Science in Management

Excerpt

The quality of life at work, the quality of work itself, the cost of living and the viability of our economic institutions are all strongly influenced by the way that large organizations are managed. In this book I have tried, in a concise and non-technical manner, to examine how the behavioral sciences have been employed by a few progressive companies in an effort to use their human resources more effectively.

Most of the cases discussed here are North American, simply because they fall within my particular area of experience. However, the book itself has been prepared primarily for European and other non-American readers, who have shown considerable interest in business developments in the United States and Canada which are directly related to productivity and labor costs.

The specific themes that I have chosen to discuss represent major interventions by behavioral scientists in the management process. They are the identification of managerial talent; the attempt to control long-range labor costs through measuring and alleviating employee grievances; the attempt to influence the quality of experience that is generated by doing work; and the attempt to teach those who must collaborate to make a more useful contribution.

At the end of the book, I have selected and edited some further material from other writers that both supplements and illuminates the main text. Each study is relevant to an individual chapter, and can be referred to, if necessary, without interrupting the basic argument.

Behavioral scientists and their managerial allies are attempting nothing less than a deliberate modification of organizational cultures, so as to make them more congenial to the human spirit as we have come to understand it. There are a variety of motives for this effort, but the one that gives it the greatest urgency is the . . .

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