Intelligence Intervention in the Politics of Democratic States: The United States, Israel, and Britain

Intelligence Intervention in the Politics of Democratic States: The United States, Israel, and Britain

Intelligence Intervention in the Politics of Democratic States: The United States, Israel, and Britain

Intelligence Intervention in the Politics of Democratic States: The United States, Israel, and Britain

Synopsis

"Bar-Joseph offers a well-conceived and well-written analysis of intelligence agencies and their relationships with political authority.... His work is excellent in every respect. He creates a sound theoretical framework from which to judge his case studies and provides a convincing analysis in these case studies themselves". -- Choice

Excerpt

This book examines the interference by intelligence agencies and individuals with the politics of their own governments in the modern democratic state. It investigates only democracies since a fundamental norm of this type of regime is that intelligence organizations serve the national interest and should, therefore, be separate from politics. in contrast, in nondemocratic regimes the use of intelligence agencies by the government in power for its own parochial interests (for example, against political opposition) or the participation of intelligence organizations in the internal struggle for power are dominant norms that by definition, make the intelligence community part of domestic politics.

In theory, intelligence work, much like academia, should be objective, autonomous, and free of political influence. It should be limited to two main tasks: first, to supply policymakers with objective information, analysis, and advice designed to assist action; and, second, to implement policy in accordance with political direction, through covert action. in reality, however, intelligence work is seldom autonomous and free from political pressures. Moreover, in many cases intelligence work ceases to be objective. Political preferences and intra- and interbureaucratic interests, as well as personal ones, can influence the conduct of the intelligence work that should ideally be done solely on the basis of its "professional ethic."

This book attempts to explain the behavior of intelligence organizations and individuals in such situations by focusing on three questions: (1) Under what conditions will political considerations dominate intelligence work? (2) What motivates intelligence organizations to interfere with the political decisionmaking process? (3) in what ways and by what means do these organizations intervene in politics?

It is important to emphasize that this book is not a study of the general relationship between the intelligence makers and the governmental decisionmaking apparatus. Although a general framework of this relationship is constructed in the theoretical part of this work, it serves only as a . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.