Theory of Knowledge: An Introduction

Theory of Knowledge: An Introduction

Theory of Knowledge: An Introduction

Theory of Knowledge: An Introduction

Excerpt

I do not see how a book can serve to introduce non-experts to philosophy unless it is elementary. Therefore that this book is elementary and covers much already well-worked ground I impenitently confess. Much of it is devoted to dealing with theories and arguments which I hold to be false, and to showing why I hold them to be false. I have thought it more important to exhibit ways of philosophical thinking and discussion (even though some of them may be thought to be outmoded) than to arrive at definite conclusions. I have judged it to be the main purpose of this series to suggest to readers what are some of the problems of philosophy, and to indicate methods of tackling them. Within the limits available it has not been possible both to carry out that programme and to provide carefully tailored solutions to the questions raised. Nothing better than reach-me-down answers can be hoped for, where answers are offered at all. If they help to cultivate the beginner's taste for haute couture in philosophy, the object of the book will have been achieved. Practised philosophers have nothing to gain by reading it.

My thanks are due to Professor H. J. Paton, Mr. H. H. Cox, and to Mr. H. P. Grice, each of whom read the whole of or part of the manuscript and made many helpful criticisms, from which I have tried to profit; and to Mr. B. G. Mitchell, who relieved me of the tedious task of compiling the index.

A. D. W.

February, 1949.

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