The Psychology of Time

The Psychology of Time

The Psychology of Time

The Psychology of Time

Excerpt

"The psychologist may if he pleases make the gradual development of our ideas of time the object of his inquiry, though, beyond some obvious considerations which lead to nothing, there is no hope of his arriving at any important result." Lotze, Metaphysic, B. II, ch. iii.

This harsh prediction is perhaps not entirely without justification to-day. By itself any subject--even metaphysics--is largely helpless before the study of Time. Time lies on the confines of so many subjects: anthropology, astronomy, metaphysics, theology, physics, mechanics, mathematics, logic, and psychology, and even the poets have something to say about it. I have attempted to put together a sketch of the subject keeping these different aspects in mind, even if I have not treated of them directly. I could not have treated of any one of them except in outline in a book of this size, and my lack of specialist knowledge has saved me from attempting an encyclopædia. The book is psychological in that the point of view throughout has been dictated by human experience. There is theory, but it is based on observation and sometimes on experiment. If the experiments seem crude I must plead necessity. The facilities for psychological research in this country are so inadequate that I have had to do the work out of touch with a laboratory, with no apparatus but a stop-watch. I have, however, lamented the necessity less in this subject . . .

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