Introduction to Green's Moral Philosophy

Introduction to Green's Moral Philosophy

Introduction to Green's Moral Philosophy

Introduction to Green's Moral Philosophy

Excerpt

The main purpose of this volume, which deals with the whole of the Prolegomena and with the Prolegomena alone, is to present a systematic account of Green's moral philosophy. Discounting this Preface, a few footnotes and the critical notes forming the Appendix, the work is entirely expository.

A book of this character will naturally enough appeal to but a small public, and its issue requires some explanation. It is intended for the use of undergraduates in those Colleges where the Prolegomena is included amongst the prescribed texts for Intermediate and Honours classes in philosophy. It should be added that some acquaintance with Green's predecessors, particularly Kant, is presupposed. There is already a fairly extensive literature on Green's philosophy, but the account of his system by Fairbrother is the only book I have seen which aims at the kind of exposition I have had in mind; and even Fairbrother's volume, including within its relatively small compass more than the Prolegomena, offers a less intensive study of that work than one could have wished.

As a text-book the Prolegomena has several disadvantages. To follow Green's thought demands considerable effort under even the most favourable conditions. There is a sustained concentration in his reasoning, and similar concentration is demanded of the reader who would understand him. This of course is to be expected in the case of every great philosopher; but in addition to this natural and unavoidable difficulty in making sense of Green's moral philosophy, the . . .

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