Apes & Men

Apes & Men

Apes & Men

Apes & Men

Excerpt

The extension of Charles Darwin's point of view to the interpretation of civilization is one of the most far-reaching changes in the intellectual life of our time. Anthropologists and geographers, archaeologists and historians have accumulated contributions in many fields, and the present writers feel that they should attempt a review of the more general aspects of these detailed studies. In doing so they wish to offer their tribute of appreciation to the efforts of Professors Breuil, Boule, Hoernes, Menghin, Myres, Obermaier, Osborn, and Sollas in this field. The growth of knowledge is so rapid that they cannot claim to be fully informed, nor can conclusions on many points attain a high degree of stability. It is, nevertheless, their hope that a considerable portion of the present work represents a fairly widespread consensus of opinion, and that the fresh suggestions embodied here and there may be useful in stimulating inquiry.

The work is in too condensed a form to allow of the inclusion of documentation, but the reader may follow this up in the volumes mentioned at the end of each chapter, and in books and papers by the authors, chiefly in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute and in Man.

Many thanks are due to the authors, editors, and publishers of the following works and journals for permission to reproduce figures: Epic of Creation, by S. Langdon (Clarendon Press), for Fig. 1; Textbook of Palaeontology, vol. i, by K. von Zittel, for Fig. 7; Evolution of Man, by G. Elliot Smith (Oxford University Press), for Figs. 11, 41, 42, and 44; Man and his Past, by O. G. S. Crawford (Oxford University Press), for Fig. 47; J. Reid Moir, Tertiary Man in England, from Natural History . . .

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