Taft and Roosevelt: The Intimate Letters of Archie Butt - Vol. 1

Taft and Roosevelt: The Intimate Letters of Archie Butt - Vol. 1

Taft and Roosevelt: The Intimate Letters of Archie Butt - Vol. 1

Taft and Roosevelt: The Intimate Letters of Archie Butt - Vol. 1

Excerpt

When the steamship Titanic sank in the Atlantic on the night of April 14,1912, one of the brave men who stayed on her deck watching the lifeboats carry women and children to safety, was Archibald Willingham Butt, major in the United States Army, military aide at the White House since 1908, and friend of two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft.

"After I heard that part of the ship's company had gone down," said President Taft, "I gave up hope for the rescue of Major Butt, unless by accident. I knew that he would certainly remain on the ship's deck until every duty had been performed and every sacrifice made that properly fell on one charged, as he would feel himself charged, with responsibility for the rescue of others."

Archie Butt, as he was popularly known the country over, wrote letters home, first to his mother and then to his sister-in-law, almost every day while he was the aide and constant companion of Presidents Roosevelt and Taft. His letters of the Roosevelt period were published in 1924. In the further letters now opened to the public he tells the story of the Taft administration as he saw it--the political problems and social life of the White House, the important happenings as well as the less important gossip of the national capital, and, most striking of all, the gradual development of the historic Taft-Roosevelt controversy.

Of that controversy the country has heard explanations without number. Partisan versions of its causes and results have filled columns in the newspapers and pages in many . . .

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