Historical Evolution of Hispanic America

Historical Evolution of Hispanic America

Historical Evolution of Hispanic America

Historical Evolution of Hispanic America

Excerpt

In writing this survey of the history of Hispanic America I have kept the following objectives constantly in mind: (1) To strike a proper balance between solid facts, synthesis, and interpretation; (2) to treat the colonial era in such manner as to give a correct impression of the movement of the stream of history through a period of three centuries, and especially to convey an adequate impression of change and progress between the years 1600 and 1750; (3) to avoid the handbook method in dealing with the national period and give the student the benefit of suggestions regarding the similarities and contrasts in the historical development of the twenty republics of Hispanic America; (4) to emphasize the important changes which have taken place in the region since the beginning of the second decade of the twentieth century; and (5) to present an adequate survey of the foreign relations of these nations. In treating this last phase of the subject I have reproduced large sections of my recent book entitled Latin America in World Politics.

Although I have devoted comparatively small space to scientific, literary, artistic, and educational achievements, I have not failed to point out that important developments have taken place in these fields. I have deemed it advisable, however, to leave the fuller treatment of such matters to more competent hands: to literati, scientists, critics of art, painting, and architecture, and educational experts. In the reading lists I have called attention to a few of the best historical works of Hispanic-Americin authors. I have not presented more numerous citations because of the well known linguistic limitations of the students and readers of the United States.

In the preparation of the present volume I have received helpful suggestions from Professor L. F. Hill of Ohio State University and Professors John Tate Lanning and Alan K. Manchester of Duke University. I acknowledge with gratitude the assistance of these scholars, but I must assume entire responsibility for errors in fact or interpretation. To Professor Herbert E. Bolton I am deeply in-

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