Pre-Raphaelite Painters

Pre-Raphaelite Painters

Pre-Raphaelite Painters

Pre-Raphaelite Painters

Excerpt

He birth of the Pre-Raphaelite movement was not an unheralded occasion, to be clearly dated from the conversations that took place in 1848 and 1849 between Holman Hunt, Millais and Rossetti, in which they endeavoured to define for themselves the inexpressible objects of their association, or from the appearance at the Academy in the latter year of Hunt Rienzi and Millais' Lorenzo and Isabella. The small but piercing voice then raised which still has, for many of us, such a singular attraction was one result only, one miniature crystallization of processes of thought and feeling that had long been operating in the minds of others, in the mind of Europe generally. Their operation can be traced from the productions of the Pre-Raphaelites' immediate elders to a relatively remote past. In 1844, William Dyce, who was pursuing, less tenaciously, the same path as that upon which the Pre-Raphaelites, with so much more urgency of purpose, set forth, had already begun his picture of St. John leading Mary Magdalene from the Tomb, a work which, when some years later it was finished, was characteristically Pre-Raphaelite-- though it must fairly be admitted that the artist had then had sufficient opportunity of becoming aware of the tendentious beginnings of Millais and Holman Hunt, by whose practices he was in fact influenced. In the 1830's, John Frederick Lewis was elaborating in Cairo a water-colour style which, with its painful . . .

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