The Psychology of Language

The Psychology of Language

The Psychology of Language

The Psychology of Language

Excerpt

This book attempts to give a full discussion of those phases of psychology which have a bearing upon the general phenomena of language and to treat the accepted laws of language from a psychological point of view. It is hoped that the coöperation of men interested in the two fields will have the advantage of coördinated treatment and possibly provide some new points of approach. The book is designed to give a general survey of the facts of language and a psychological interpretation of those facts which shall meet the needs of students of language and of students of psychology. The first of the authors is responsible for Chapters II and IV-X; the second for Chapters I, III, XI, and XII.

Throughout the volume language is treated from the point of view of current psychological theory. From the days of the ancient Greeks, language has been studied in the West from the points of view successively of metaphysics, of formal logic, of scholasticism, and (particularly during the last century) of psychology in the various stages of its development, including the recent phase of physiological psychology. This last stage paved the way for the biological study of language. Few linguists, however, have broken away from the traditional views and awakened to a realization of the importance of applying the data of the biological sciences to the interpretation of language phenomena. To realize what a flood of light can be thrown upon the language processes by this means one has only to reflect that there are really no speech organs in the strict sense of the . . .

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