The Sources of John Dryden's Comedies

The Sources of John Dryden's Comedies

The Sources of John Dryden's Comedies

The Sources of John Dryden's Comedies

Excerpt

Few writers have had so much critical work devoted to them as has John Dryden. His poetry and essays were early studied, their sources noted and discussed, the rhyme and the meter of the one and the literary style of the other written on exhaustively. His heroic plays and tragedies have been only slightly less thoroughly treated. Articles which confine themselves merely to Dryden's use and temporary relinquishment of rhyme in his heroic plays would make a good-sized bibliography.

But very little critical study has been given to Dryden's comedies; in fact, there is no one book which devotes itself solely to them. They are touched on in biographies of Dryden, in histories of Restoration drama or of Restoration literature as a whole, and in a few works on Dryden's criticism; but the authors who discuss them do so only as the least important and least interesting portion of a larger task.

In view of this fact some readers of the following chapters may think that I have given too much of my space to calling attention to the errors and the omissions of former critics, such as Sir Walter Scott, George Saintsbury, and Allardyce Nicoll. To such readers let me say as emphatically as possible that I realize that -- because of the limited nature of my field -- I deserve no great credit for having found mistakes in the more comprehensive works of these men. My reason for calling attention to their errors in my text and footnotes originally was to answer any possible question by those who were directing the work on my dissertation as to whether or . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.