The Eisenhower Years: Affairs of State

The Eisenhower Years: Affairs of State

The Eisenhower Years: Affairs of State

The Eisenhower Years: Affairs of State

Excerpt

There is again much talk of General Eisenhower for President. In fact, what might be called the second Eisenhower boom is under way. As a political movement, it is less formidable than the one the General put a stop to on January 22, 1948, when he announced that he was "not available for and could not accept nomination to high political office." It is natural that this boom should be quieter than the first and highly desirable from the point of view of those who favor the present movement. We are now almost midway between elections, and public interest in presidential politics is about as low as it ever gets in the four- year cycle. If the second Eisenhower boom were more formidable now, it would be less formidable in 1952. When water is brought to a boil too early, much of it passes away in steam.

Still, the boom is on in a small, promising way. It is reported in New York that the president of Columbia University will be the state's entry at the 1952 Republican convention. He is said to have been seeing a good deal of Governor Dewey, and the Governor is said to be favorably impressed. It is reported from the Middle West that Roy Roberts, the president of the Kansas City Star and a prairie Warwick who had a lot to do with the earlier boom stands ready to line up Eisenhower delegates when the proper time is at hand. Governor Warren is said to have the case of Eisenhower under advisement. The movers and shakers are thinking things over, and occasional feelers are put out to the public. Dr. Gallup has been around interviewing again -- "successfully applying," he says with confidence, "the lessons . . .

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