Lectures on Ancient History, from the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus: Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 1

Lectures on Ancient History, from the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus: Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 1

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Lectures on Ancient History, from the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus: Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 1

Lectures on Ancient History, from the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus: Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 1

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The Lectures on Ancient History here presented to the English public, have been edited by Dr. Marcus Niebuhr, the son of the Historian, with the assistance of Mr. F. Spiro and Dr, Isler. They embrace the history of the ancient world, with the exception of that of Rome, down to the time, when all the other nations and states of classical antiquity were absorbed by the empire of Rome, and when its history became, in point of fact, the history of the world. Hence the present course of Lectures, together with that on the History of Rome, form a complete course embracing the whole of ancient history.

In the programme of the University of Bonn for the winter- session of 1829 and 30, Niebuhr himself announced these Lectures in the following terms: "Historia aevi antiqui, eo ordine iisque limitibus qui in Justini libris servantur," which at once describe their extent and arrangement.

The Lectures on Ancient History were twice delivered by Niebuhr, first during the summer of 1826, and a second time during the winter of 1829 and 30; but, owing to the fire which destroyed Niebuhr's house in the night between the 5th and 6th of February, 1830, the course of Lectures was interrupted, and Niebuhr completed it in the ensuing summer. In both courses, he followed the plan adopted by Justin or Trogus Pompeius, and carried the history down to the taking of Alexandria by Octavianus; but the history of the last century in both cases is a mere sketch, the Lecturer not having . . .

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