Educating Superior Students: Co-Operative Studies Carried on under the Auspices of the Association of First Assistants in the High Schools of the City of New York

Educating Superior Students: Co-Operative Studies Carried on under the Auspices of the Association of First Assistants in the High Schools of the City of New York

Educating Superior Students: Co-Operative Studies Carried on under the Auspices of the Association of First Assistants in the High Schools of the City of New York

Educating Superior Students: Co-Operative Studies Carried on under the Auspices of the Association of First Assistants in the High Schools of the City of New York

Excerpt

This book, published on the initiative of the First Assistants Association of the City of New York, is co-operative in character. Its fourteen chapters grew out of a series of investigations undertaken by the first assistants of the city high schools, under the chairmanship of Dr. John F. McNeill, now principal of Erasmus Hall High School. As is perhaps not generally known, first assistants are high school supervisors, immediately below the rank of principal, who have successfully passed a series of examinations wider in scope and more difficult in subject matter than any other examination set for high school teachers. First assistants hold the key positions in the high schools; they control the education of teachers in service, the materials of instruction, and the relations of their special subjects to community needs and economic modifications.

The investigations were carried on by committees of first assistants by means of questionnaires, circulated in all the high schools, supplemented by interviews and by surveys. The questionnaires sought facts in regard to the proportion and distribution of students in the higher intelligence levels, the practices governing the classification and the treatment of superior groups and talented individuals, general aims and specific objectives, the curriculum in terms of units and activities, as well as the extracurricular groupings, and all types of exploratory teaching.

Thus in their original form the chapters in this book were the outcome of a carefully planned series of research units, designed to be of service to teachers and to administrators; to be of value specifically to all departments, since, though there are always techniques and procedures peculiar to particular subjects, certain work methods and achievements are common to all. Also, in the older fields of . . .

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