Ideology and the Irish Question: Ulster Unionism and Irish Nationalism, 1912-1916

Ideology and the Irish Question: Ulster Unionism and Irish Nationalism, 1912-1916

Ideology and the Irish Question: Ulster Unionism and Irish Nationalism, 1912-1916

Ideology and the Irish Question: Ulster Unionism and Irish Nationalism, 1912-1916

Synopsis

Going right to the heart of the Irish Question, Paul Bew offers a re-interpretation of Irish politics in the critical 1912-1916 period. Bew offers a full treatment of the debate concerning land, economy, religion, language, and national identity in the period, and ends with a discussion of the Easter Rising of 1916 which destroyed Redmond's party. The political, cultural, and economic implications of this development are drawn out, and Bew examines their continuing effect on Irish history.

Excerpt

'The Irish parliamentary party so degraded the political process that no man or woman of sensitivity or idealism could have any part of it. . . . Did the utmost conciliation of John Redmond, for instance, make any difference to the Ulster Unionists?'

C. J. Haughey, The Spirit of the Nation, 310, 529

MR JOHN CUSACK. Sir Edward Carson persecuted many leaders of the nationalist movement--amongst them were Parnell and Davitt--whose names will never be forgotten by the Irish people (cheer).

Today the soul of this Apostle of Law and Order (Laughter) is bursting at the mention of the Imperial forces being brought to Ulster to preserve law and order. He has now constituted himself the High Priest of the Army in Ireland and elsewhere; he tried to bully the Crown, to corrupt the Army, to blackmail the Cabinet and to raise a general hell in these islands

MR JAMES GILSENAN. He will repent.

MR JOHN FLYNN. He will have to repent.

Trim Board of Guardians and UDC, Leinster Leader, 13 June 1914

The attempt to rescue one neglected and despised historic ideology-- Ulster unionism during the home rule crisis--from oblivion may be regarded as brave. To attempt to rescue a second and contemporary ideology--'Redmondism', or constitutional Irish nationalism-- considered foolhardy, especially when that second ideology was locked throughout its life in an apparent death struggle with the first. Such a project may also appear to be self-contradictory and futile. For some, the futility of the exercise would be confirmed by the fact that any positive re-evaluation of Redmondism--the claim for example that the Irish party leadership actually possessed a relatively viable political . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.