Quantitative Chemical Techniques of Histo- and Cytochemistry - Vol. 1

Quantitative Chemical Techniques of Histo- and Cytochemistry - Vol. 1

Quantitative Chemical Techniques of Histo- and Cytochemistry - Vol. 1

Quantitative Chemical Techniques of Histo- and Cytochemistry - Vol. 1

Excerpt

When the writer finished Techniques of Histo- and Cytochemistry (1949), and the immense relief at having done with it at last had had time to subside, he seriously considered future editions to keep it up to date. That this was rather naive for one who did not wish to devote himself entirely to writing soon became apparent with the post-war sudden expansion of the field. For a new edition the original volume would have to be expanded to a number of volumes. In future editions the number of volumes would have to keep increasing. Soon the author would have to be displaced by the editor, then subeditors would have to be added. With the increasing momentum of development, the useful life of each succeeding edition would shorten. Supplements to the editions would have to be added, but even this device would be overwhelmed and, finally, the literary dinosaur would bog down in an awful, self-defeated mess and, fortunately, it too would become extinct.

With such comforting thoughts in mind, the writer was further consoled by the fact that, subsequent to the publication of his book, a variety of monographs appeared in which limited areas of the field were covered by individual authors. In addition, a few collaborative volumes have come out in which specific techniques are given chapter reviews. However, quantitative chemical techniques, in general, have received much less attention than others and it is the purpose of the present work to bring only the former up-to-date in a convenient compact form, which, even so, requires two volumes.

The most significant advances are bound to come from a combination of chemical localization and quantitation, but the former has been exploited separately, to a great extent, and much less emphasis has been given the latter. It is natural that this pattern was followed since the greatest volume of work has been carried forward predominantly by those trained in disciplines that have been chiefly morphological, and the addition of the qualitative chemical vector opened new orchards replete with ripe fruit waiting to be picked without venturing into strange fields of chemical and physical measurement.

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