Democracy Today and Tomorrow

Democracy Today and Tomorrow

Democracy Today and Tomorrow

Democracy Today and Tomorrow

Excerpt

In starting my lectures on the problems of democracy at the University of Chicago I stressed at the very beginning the feelings with which I took on my task.

Since my early youth I have admired the United States of America, its people, its advance and growth, which nothing can check, its noble traditions, its struggles for liberty, for democracy, for the free development of the individual and of the whole nation and state, and the great place in the history of modern humanity which it has acquired and which will be even greater in future.

In my own life and in the life of my nation the great national leaders of the United States had their important place, which they never have lost and will never lose. Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln, as well as all the leaders of the democracy before, during, and after the World War, were also our leaders and our teachers. Our state was reborn to new free life with the assistance of the United States during the World War, and our democratic republic under the leadership of President Masaryk considered itself a small sister republic of the great American Commonwealth. We felt this not only because of the unforgettable assistance of the United States, but also because of the spirit, the ideals and traditions of freedom and democracy, which have inspired the United States of America since their independence, and which inspired also the war and postwar representatives of the Czechoslovak nation. The Czechoslovak people, even today, after the Munich agreement from October, 1938, and after their temporary . . .

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