Winesburg, Ohio: A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life

Winesburg, Ohio: A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life

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Winesburg, Ohio: A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life

Winesburg, Ohio: A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life

Read FREE!

Synopsis

Winesburg, Ohio is like that wheel of many colors, of which Anatole France writes, which had only to revolve to give a harmony of all the parts, which becomes the truth. These separate fragments of mid-American society combine to make a picture of American life which carries the inescapable conviction of reality. The stories are written out of the depths of imagination and intuition, out of a prolonged brooding over the fascinating spectacle of existence, but they combine that quality with a marvelous faculty of precise observation. Thus, the impression of surface realism is reinforced by that deeper realism which sees beyond and beneath the exterior world to the hidden reality which is the essence of things. Did not Schopenhauer, interpreting Goethe's own confessions, point out that this is precisely the quality of the artist: that it is given to him alone to perceive the metaphysically Real--das Ding au sich?

Excerpt

Sherwood Anderson was born at Clyde, Ohio, in 1876, and it was not until his fortieth year that his first book, Windy McPherson's Son, was published. When that novel appeared its author was scarcely known beyond the small circle of readers who had seen his powerful stories in the little reviews which can afford out of their poverty to have the courage of their convictions. He was a contributor from the outset to The Little Review, whose files contain so many of the names which now give contemporary American literature a quality and a significance that are truly national. It is noteworthy that many of the chapters in Winesburg, Ohio, the book which made his name, are reprinted from that and other periodicals of his experimental years. The legend is that Sherwood Anderson had "a trunkful" of fiction when he made his bid for fame with Windy McPherson's Son in 1916, and the following year he issued Marching Men, followed in 1918 by a volume of poems, excellently entitled Mid-American Chants, That was the sum of Sherwood Anderson's work when he published the book which now receives the consecration of being included in a library of the world's modern classics . . .

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