Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, 1863

Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, 1863

Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, 1863

Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, 1863

Synopsis

In 1863 the news of Northern victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg made the outcome of the Civil War clear to young Wiley Britton, who was fighting for the Union with the Sixth Kansas Cavalry. But there was still hell to pay before anyone could go home. Nowhere else was the war so brutal as on the borders of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and the Indian territory, where bushwhackers and guerrilas dogged the heels of men going into battle. Always just ahead was the artillery fire of the Confederates. Trying to do his job and stay alive, private Britton wrote about engagements at Pea Ridge, Prairie Grove, Cane Hill, and elsewhere. Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, supplies a personal dimension unavailable to later historians, describing at firsthand the look of the countryside, the plight of its citizens, and, most poignantly, the faces and voices of comrades marching into history.

Excerpt

By Phillip Thomas Tucker

As no other Civil War account does, Wiley Britton's Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border, 1863 fully illuminates and illustrates the character of the little-known conflict on the western border of the trans-Mississippi theater during the decisive year of 1863. Britton wrote, "I have endeavored to make the work a panoramic view of military operations and events on the borders of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and the Indian Territory during the year 1863." Britton's Memoirs is more than a story that concentrates exclusively on military activities, for he also tells of the plight of the long-suffering common people of Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and the Indian Territory and records the social, political, and economic conditions on the western border. in addition, Britton chronicles the experiences and sacrifices of the common soldiers during the war west of the Mississippi River.

No theater of operations in the most written about conflict in American history has been more overlooked than the trans-Mississippi. This has been surprising because the Confederate trans-Mississippi theater was a strategically important region, which included Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, and the Indian and Arizona territories. Generations of historians have focused instead on the more glamorous and better-publicized war in the East, primarily in Virginia. and no part of the trans- Mississippi war was more obscure than the conflict on the western border.

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