India, Pakistan, Ceylon

India, Pakistan, Ceylon

India, Pakistan, Ceylon

India, Pakistan, Ceylon

Excerpt

Among the important political developments in Asia since the Second World War has been the emergence of India, Pakistan, and Ceylon from a dependent colonial position into full self-rule. Of these the first two were constituted from the old British "Indian Empire," which on August 15, 1947, was partitioned and each part granted dominion status in the British Commonwealth of Nations. Thus ended the epoch of British domination in the land which had had the unflattering distinction of being the world's greatest colonial possession. India formally proclaimed itself a sovereign republic on January 26, 1950, though it continues to be a member of the Commonwealth. Pakistan has remained a dominion. Similarly, on February 4, 1948, Ceylon passed from crown colony to dominion and retains that status today.

British control of the region now occupied by India, Pakistan, and Ceylon has been only a very recent matter, being a phenomenon of no more than two centuries in a known history of civilization extending over five millenniums. That region early evolved one of the world's great cultural complexes, the Indic, distinct from any other in many major features of religion, philosophy, art, social organization. This went abroad to central . . .

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