Early Child Development in the French Tradition: Contributions from Current Research

Early Child Development in the French Tradition: Contributions from Current Research

Early Child Development in the French Tradition: Contributions from Current Research

Early Child Development in the French Tradition: Contributions from Current Research

Synopsis

This volume shares significant contemporary "Francophone" contributions to developmental psychology outside geographic and intellectual borders of French-speaking countries. Except for the spread of Piagetian theory after World War II into Anglophone psychology, these new publications have not become so well known worldwide as progress in Francophone developmental psychology warrants. However, the work of a new generation of developmental theorists and experimentalists continues to shape important and original lines of thinking and research in France, Canada, and in other French-speaking countries. This work also contributes uniquely to issues such as sensori-motor development, perception, language acquisition, social interaction, and the growth and induction of cognitive mechanisms.

Scientific concepts are not only embedded in a paradigm, but also in a culture and a language. Instead of writing about Francophone developmental psychology from "outside," this volume brings together original English-language contributions written by researchers working in different Francophone countries. Chapters summarize and interpret research on a given topic, making explicit the context of philosophical and theoretical traditions in which the empirical advances are embedded. Original essays are accompanied by editorial commentaries from eminent scientists working on the same topics in other parts of the world -- topics that are closely related to Francophone streams of thought and themes of study. Together, these essays fully and faithfully represent modern scientific perspectives toward understanding many facets of mental growth and development of the young child.

Excerpt

With the exception of the embrace of Piagetian theory after World War II by Anglophone psychology, modern Francophone research in the domain of human development has not become well known worldwide.

The work of a new generation of developmental theorists and experimentalists continues to shape important and original lines of thinking and research in France, Canada, and other French-speaking countries, and to contribute unique perspectives on perception, cognition, and communication. Paris, Montreal, and Geneva have provided continuous fruitful soil for research in human development, generating philosophical schools, research institutes, and eminent scientists. These cities have functioned as cradles for scientific study and still attract international meetings and conferences on child development.

Scientific concepts and research traditions are not only embedded in a paradigm, but also in a culture and in a language. the present volume testifies to the great number of refreshing ideas and heuristic paths that contemporary research in the French tradition offers an international audience. It brings together original contributions, written by researchers from different Francophone countries, to give a full account of the French tradition, including not only Piagetian paradigms, but also the concepts of Henri Wallon and other more recent authors. These contributions provide the reader with a fuller understanding of current French research practice and theory. Each chapter summarizes and interprets work on a given topic and makes explicit the context of Francophone philosophical and theoretical traditions in which the empirical advances are embedded.

This volume is divided into four sections. in the first, sensorimotor behavior and perceptuocognitive functioning are examined from different viewpoints. the second section focuses on sociocognitive development in both infancy and early . . .

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