The Internet and Telecommunications Policy: Selected Papers from the 1995 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference

The Internet and Telecommunications Policy: Selected Papers from the 1995 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference

The Internet and Telecommunications Policy: Selected Papers from the 1995 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference

The Internet and Telecommunications Policy: Selected Papers from the 1995 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference

Synopsis

This book is based on the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference which reports on research into telecommunications policy issues. While the conference is now a respectable 23 years old, this is only the second printed edition of selected papers. A new law, the Telecommunications Act of 1996, accelerated the process of integration in the communication industry and made major revisions to the Communications Act of 1934 that increase the incentive for integration within the industry. Although the papers in this volume were written prior to the passage of the new law, their importance is merely enhanced by it. They deal with fundamental, complex policy problems that arise when previously separate segments of the telecommunications industry are integrated, rather than specific regulatory rules that are likely to be changed under the new law. With the passage of this law, the timeframe for developing appropriate policies for an integrated industry has been shortened. Changes expected to occur over a period of several years will now likely occur much more rapidly. These papers provide insights to help guide the transition in the industry. Divided into five parts, this volume:
• deals with problems of transforming local exchange telephone service from a monopoly in each geographical area to an interconnected competitive network of networks,
• considers the pricing problems that arise in an integrated network carrying traffic of different types across multiple service providers,
• examines the problem of achieving interoperability in complex networks,
• considers issues of intellectual property that arise in expected integrated networks of the future, and
• discusses electronic publication of scholarly journals, copyright protection, and the applicability of copyright law in the digital age.

Excerpt

David P. Reed Cable Television Laboratories, Inc.

Welcome to the second printed edition of selected papers from the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference (TPRC). As the Chair of the organizing committee for this year's conference, it is my honor to introduce the selected works of the 23rd annual tprc.

Tprc has become the pre-eminent conference reporting on research of telecommunications policy issues. While the conference is now a respectful 23 years old, this is only the second printed edition of selected papers from the conference. One can sense a new tradition of scholarship associated with tprc is developing with the annual publication of this book series.

At the outset I want to thank and congratulate the members of the organizing committee for their contributions in leading the conference. These members include Marjory Blumenthal of the National Research Council, Tim Brennan of the University of Maryland, Martin Cave of Brunel University, Allan Hammond of New York Law School, David Lytel of the Office of Science and Technology Policy of the White House, Russ Neuman of Tufts University, Lisa Rosenblum of the New York Public Service Commission, and David Waterman of Indiana University. Without their efforts the quality of the conference that attendees traditionally expect would not have been achieved this year.

Given the large number of changes that occurred in the fast-moving telecommunications policy field in 1995, the organizing committee was faced with numerous difficult decisions in reaching the final composition of the program. in the end, the program reflected the continuing development of several themes, although two themes stand out in importance given the events of 1995.

The first such major theme looked at the continued struggle of lawmakers and regulators at both the federal and state levels to further open local telecommunications markets to competition. One tprc plenary session therefore examined elements of the proposed telecommunications reform bill slated for passage in . . .

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