The Bodacious Ozarks: True Tales of the Backhills

The Bodacious Ozarks: True Tales of the Backhills

The Bodacious Ozarks: True Tales of the Backhills

The Bodacious Ozarks: True Tales of the Backhills

Excerpt

There is good reason to believe that the Ozarks are the oldest land surfaces on the Western hemisphere and that to a considerable extent they have waited apart for millions or tens of millions of years. Geological evidence suggests that the Ozarks began as a towering mountain range, the inaccessibly tall Himalayas of an era perhaps hundreds of millions of years ago, and that rivers and perhaps other erosive forces wore down those vast mountains and remade them into a plateau which may have covered as much as a third of the present U.S.A. In time the great central plateau was covered by seas, presumably impounded by the explosive uprising of younger mountain ranges to the east and west. In any case, the sea beds were spilled over with vast deposits of silts and sands and filled in farther by shells and bony residues of marine lives.

Then, apparently, the bed of the great sea was again raised or blasted up into another range of tall and faulted mountains. Again these cloud scrapers were worn down by erosion to far-stretching and swampy flatlands. These inaccessible mires were once more raised explosively and shaped into considerably smaller but very tall mountains. These, in turn and in millions of years of time, were worn down to the general dimensions and contours of the present-day Ozarks plateau or uplift.

The geological remoteness which had persisted through eons of earthly time appeared to remain a heritage of what eventually became the human populations of the Ozarks. Respected archeol-

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