Peter Martyr Vermigli and Predestination: The Augustinian Inheritance of an Italian Reformer

Peter Martyr Vermigli and Predestination: The Augustinian Inheritance of an Italian Reformer

Peter Martyr Vermigli and Predestination: The Augustinian Inheritance of an Italian Reformer

Peter Martyr Vermigli and Predestination: The Augustinian Inheritance of an Italian Reformer

Synopsis

This study is in its broadest sense an inquiry into the intellectual origins of the Reformed branch of Protestantism generally, but inaccurately, designated Calvinism. More specifically, it concerns one of the early theologians who gave formative shape to Reformed theology, Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562), and focuses on his adoption of the soteriological doctrine of gemina praedestinatio, double predestination: divine election and divine reprobation.

Excerpt

I owe a great intellectual debt to Heiko A. Oberman and Alister E. McGrath, the former for his profound insight into the matrix of Reformation thought and the latter for his clarification of many Reformation complexities. Although they differ in significant respects, both laid the foundation for this work by teaching me that the Reformation must be viewed in its late medieval context. Special acknowledgement is due also to the pioneering work of Damasus Trapp, OSA, whose intellectual inspiration was fundamental to the undertaking of this research. I am also indebted to the many wise words of Barry Collett, who was a competent and cordial mentor with whom I discussed most of my ideas. The encouragement of two others was particularly important early in my academic career--the late Philip Edgcumbe Hughes of Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, who first introduced me to Peter Martyr in his seminar on 'Forerunners to the Reformation', and Donald Kelly of Villanova University, who believed in me. I remain in the debt of these men.

Much is owed to the small but growing band of Vermigli scholars on whose shoulders I stand. Not only have they set high academic standards in their work, but they have graciously welcomed me into their circle. Especially generous were Marvin W. Anderson, John Patrick Donnelly, and Joseph C. McLelland, all of whom are now friends and colleagues in our common endeavour, the English translation of Vermigli's works for the Peter Martyr Library.

Other scholars, although not experts on Vermigli, gave crucial assistance in their areas of expertise: Irena Backus, Monique Brupbacher-David, Dermot Fenlon, Elisabeth Gleason, Benedict Hackett, Nigel Knight, James McConica, Giuseppe Micheli, Richard Muller, John Quinn, Paolo Sambin, Lewis Spitz, Robert Walton, and Ruth Wenzel-Whittle.

I am profoundly grateful to Philip M. J. McNair (Darwin College, Cambridge) and John Platt (Pembroke College, Oxford) . . .

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