Some Main Problems of Philosophy

Some Main Problems of Philosophy

Some Main Problems of Philosophy

Some Main Problems of Philosophy

Excerpt

I hope Professor Wisdom was right in thinking that this book was worth publishing. It consists of twenty lectures which I delivered at Morley College in London in the winter of 1910-11, the first ten being given before Christmas, and the second ten after. And I think I should have had less hope that they were worth publishing had I not thought (perhaps mistakenly) that, though much of them is no doubt "out of date," yet they also contain much which is as yet by no means out of date.

My audience were invited after each lecture to raise questions about what I had said in it, and it is to one of the resulting discussions that the first sentence of Chapter 15 refers.

The lectures are now printed substantially in the form in which they were delivered. I have made a good many verbal changes, substituting for an expression which I used in the lectures another expression which I now think expresses my meaning better. But I could not make such changes everywhere: my old terminology still appears in many places; and I have therefore added footnotes explaining where I now think it to be incorrect. In Chapters 19 and 20, however, I have made more extensive alterations, though only by omission -- omission of several pages, which seem to me now both confused and confusing and not to make any substantial addition to what I was saying. I have, therefore, I believe, retained the substance even of these two chapters, and have added an Appendix to explain what seem to me to be the chief defects in what I have retained.

I am well aware that there are a good many positive mistakes in what is here printed; and there is besides a good deal of repetition, since I often repeated at the beginning of a lecture part of what I had said in the preceding one, hoping, in some cases, to make my meaning clearer.

There are two matters about which I should have added footnotes, had I noticed them earlier; and I should like to mention them briefly here. The first is the view which I express on p. 145, that it is possible that some material objects . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.