Economic Relations in the Asian-Pacific Region: Report of a Conference Cosponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Brookings Institution, June 1985

Economic Relations in the Asian-Pacific Region: Report of a Conference Cosponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Brookings Institution, June 1985

Economic Relations in the Asian-Pacific Region: Report of a Conference Cosponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Brookings Institution, June 1985

Economic Relations in the Asian-Pacific Region: Report of a Conference Cosponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Brookings Institution, June 1985

Excerpt

In early June 1985, the Brookings Institution and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences cosponsored a conference entitled "Economic Relations in the Asian-Pacific Region: Trends and Prospects." This was the third in an ongoing series of joint conferences organized by the two institutions. The first, held in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1981, considered political and security matters in Asia. The second, which took place in Peking, in 1982, examined global economic problems.

The most recent conference, convened at the Wye Plantation in eastern Maryland, considered the economic policies and prospects of key countries and territories in the Asian-Pacific region and the impact of those internal developments on important economic relationships in the region. In a sense, the Wye conference served to integrate the topics of the first two meetings--Asia and economics--into a single agenda.

The Wye conference brought together twelve scholars from the United States and nine scholars from the People's Republic of China who shared an interest in trade patterns and economic trends in the Pacific Basin. A list of the participants and of the papers presented at the conference appears at the end of this volume. Four sessions of the conference focused on the economic policies of the primary Pacific economic actors: the United States, China, Japan, and the newly industrialized countries of East and Southeast Asia. Two of the most important types of commodities involved in Asian-Pacific trade were also considered: laborintensive manufactures and advanced technology. At a final, less structured session, participants discussed the implications of the conference findings for Sino-American economic relations and for economic cooperation in the Asian-Pacific region.

Like its predecessors, the Wye conference was a valuable and effective way of introducing Chinese scholars to the methodologies and conclusions of American social science, building contacts between American scholars and their counterparts in China, and, above all, exchanging opinions and perspectives on policy-related . . .

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